Advocating for environmental education

I was excited to get my hands on the July issue of Eingana – the journal of Environment Education Victoria – it was my first issue as copyeditor, and the journal featured a new design to go with the organisation’s new name. This issue brings together education and advocacy, summed up nicely by EEV Vice PresidentContinue reading “Advocating for environmental education”

Victorian editors: the August 2015 newsletter is out

All things editing: professional development (Redact registration is now open), accreditation news, reviews (PerfectIt and Nick Hudson’s Modern Australian Usage); debate (the future of Australia’s editing societies), Dear Ed dishes advice on the dreaded three o’clock snooze) and hamsters.I sent the August Editors Victoria newsletter out today and it’s also online.But – you won’t find the hamsterContinue reading “Victorian editors: the August 2015 newsletter is out”

PerfectIt 3 review (or, why you need a PC)

I wrote this review for Editors Victoria’s August 2015 newsletter (not available online). Much as it galls an editor to let a mistake slip through, the general consensus seems to be that catching 95% of proofreading errors is a pretty good effort. But some editors have a secret weapon that I’m convinced helps them reachContinue reading “PerfectIt 3 review (or, why you need a PC)”

A feast of editing

I’ve just sent out the May newsletter for Editors Victoria. In it you’ll find: which of the National Literary Awards is of special interest to editors (Editors Victoria Distinguished Editor Susan Keogh has just won it) food for thought for members – should the state and territory societies all come together under the IPEd umbrella? (IPEd is Australia’s Institute ofContinue reading “A feast of editing”

FameLab Australia

If you’re a young researcher passionate about science, want to up your presentation and media skills and fancy a trip to the UK’s leading science festival… read on. Applications for FameLab Australia 2015 are open Tuesday 27 January – Friday 27 February 2015. http://au.live.solas.britishcouncil.net/programmes/science/famelab. [Update – old link removed]

Photonics, music, discovery: creativity in science

Just in case you still think that creative people do arts and the sciences are for people who are good at knowing stuff but lack imagination, have a look at this RiAus interview with physicist (and cellist) Tanya Monro. Apart from being the only person (perhaps apart from Ian Thorpe) who I’ve heard attribute theirContinue reading “Photonics, music, discovery: creativity in science”

Freelancers thank the bustling times

In the Guardian’s list of “authorisms”: The top 10 words invented by writers Freelance: i) One who sells services to employers without a long-term commitment to any of them. ii) An uncommitted independent, as in politics or social life. The word is not recorded before Sir Walter Scott introduced it in Ivanhoe, which (among otherContinue reading “Freelancers thank the bustling times”

Making molecules crystal clear

Crystallography is one of those mysterious scientific techniques you hear about – and 2014 has been the International Year of Crystallography. But what is it really? CSIRO have posted a great explanation of how we can bounce X-rays off crystals to see the structure of the component molecules, when they are too small to be seen through a lightContinue reading “Making molecules crystal clear”

Decoy nest protects young yellow-rumped thornbills

These little brown birds, seen flitting around woodlands and occasionally my garden, are clever architects whose nest deceives potential predators. I discovered this after I chose to write a piece on the yellow-rumped thornbill for the Bimblebox 153 Birds Project—a conservation meets art project highlighting the bird species recorded in Bimblebox Nature Refuge in Queensland, which isContinue reading “Decoy nest protects young yellow-rumped thornbills”

Yellow-rumped thornbill: Bimblebox Art Project

This is the text of my audio piece on the yellow-rumped thornbill for the Bimblebox 153 Birds Art Project, which is touring around Queensland to raise awareness of the Bimblebox Nature Refuge, which is threatened by coal mining. 153 species of birds have been spotted in the reserve. Yellow-rumped thornbills (Acanthiza chrysorrhoa) are endemic to Australia and widespread, particularlyContinue reading “Yellow-rumped thornbill: Bimblebox Art Project”

Book review: ‘At the edge of uncertainty’

My review of Michael Brooks’s book At the edge of uncertainty: 11 discoveries taking science by surprise was posted on Science Book a Day today. You can find it at http://sciencebookaday.com/2014/10/23/margie-beilharz-reviews-at-the-edge-of-uncertainty-11-discoveries-taking-science-by-surprise/ Thanks Science Book a Day George Aranda, it was fun to write. Read my other review posts.

Ten or more of just about everything science communication

You know how blogs posts/tweets etc entice you in with a number in the heading (ten best …, five tips on …)? Here’s even better: a compilation of lists and articles on all aspects of science communication from this week [update – old link removed], put together by Kirk Englehardt, Director of Research Communication and Marketing at Georgia Institute ofContinue reading “Ten or more of just about everything science communication”